Addition of Vitamins and Minerals

European Legislation
Regulation (EC) no. 1925/2006 contains rules on the addition of vitamins and minerals and certain other substances to foods. Annex I and II of the Regulation contain lists with vitamins, minerals and certain other substances that may be added to foods. The minimum and maximum content that apply to vitamins and minerals are still under discussion. Furthermore, the list of authorised substances has not yet been finalised. Until the maximum content has been established, the current national regulations concerning the maximum and minimum amounts apply.

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Annex III lists, among other things, the restricted substances. Regulation (EU) 2019/649 regulates that trans fatty acids will be added to this list of restricted substances under the following conditions and requirements: 
Restricted substance Conditions of use Additional requirements
Trans fat other than trans fat naturally occurring in fat of animal origin Maximum 2 grams per 100 grams of fat in food intended for the final consumer and food intended for supply to retail Food business operators supplying other food business operators with food not intended for the final consumer or not intended for supply to retail, shall ensure that supplied food business operators are provided with information on the amount of trans fat, other than trans fat naturally occurring in fat of animal origin, where that amount exceeds 2 grams per 100 grams of fat.’

 

In addition to Regulation (EC) no. 1925/2006, several national rules on the addition of vitamins and minerals to foods, as set out in the Addition of Micro-nutrients (Commodities Act) Decree, apply.

The members of the International Margarine Association of the Countries of Europe (IMACE) in the 'Code of practice on vitamin A & D fortification of margarines and fat spreads' have agreed to add vitamin A and D to margarines and spreadable fats, up to the following amounts: 

  • Vitamin A: 800 µg per 100 grams end-product; 
  • Vitamin D: 7.5 µg - 10 µg per 100 grams end-product; 

Dutch Legislation
In the Netherlands Article 5a of the Addition of Micro-nutrients (Commodities Act) Decree regulates the addition of vitamin A and D to spreadable fat products and baked and fried products. This text is included in Article 4 of the Spreadable Fat Products (Commodities Act) Decree. The rule is that the content of vitamin D in yellow fat spreads may not exceed a maximum of 0.075 µg per gram.

According to the Addition of Micro-nutrients (Commodities Act) Decree, an enriched product must contain a minimum of 15% and a maximum of 100% of the recommended daily allowance per daily portion. It is probable that different minimum and maximum amounts will be specified in the EU Regulation.

The Vitaminisation Agreement ensures that Dutch margarine producers and traders safeguard the addition of vitamin A and D. This agreement, that expired on 1 December 2005, has since regularly been extended and will apply until the maximum content of vitamins, minerals and certain other substances has been established in Regulation (EC) no. 1925/2006.  Effective from 19 January 2007, the new Addition of Folic Acid and Vitamin D Exemption (Commodities Act) Regulation furthermore applies. According to this Regulation, folic acid and vitamin D may be added to products without having to apply for an exemption from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport (VWS). The exemption for the addition of vitamin D is set at 4.5 µg/100 kcal. This means that all products containing vitamin D that remain below this amount can be placed on the market without further approval. The condition that applies to Light products is that at most the amounts of vitamin D may be added as authorised for the relevant comparable (full-fat) goods (in other words: the same amount of vitamin D may be added to a low-fat margarine [minarine] as to a margarine). To enrich products with a higher content of vitamin D than the exempted values, a request for exemption can be submitted on an individual basis. The regulation for spreadable fats will be maintained.

The Vitamin D for 60+ Individuals Exemption (Commodities Act) Regulation stipulates that the vitamin D content in yellow fat spreads for persons 60 years of age and older must be at least 0.20 µg/gram and no more than 0.25 µg/gram. The fat spread's label, in the same field of vision as the food designation, must state that the product is meant for persons 60 years of age and older.

 

Last modified: April 30, 2019 16:25