The Spreadable Fat Products (Commodities Act) Decree regulates a number of typical Dutch matters, including:

  • Definition of baking and frying products: Goods that primarily consist of a mixture of non-milk or only partially of milk-derived oils and fats, and that are designated as suitable or intended for use in baking or frying with a fat content of at least 90%, with the exception of the oils and fats as such.
  • Possibility of adding vitamin A and D to spreadable fat products, blends and baking and frying products. See Vitaminisation for additional information.

Regulation (EC) no. 1308/2013 in Appendix II establishes the rules for the sales descriptions of spreadable fats. The main descriptions of the differentiated categories are 'butter', 'margarine' and 'blend'. Margarine in this Regulation falls under the fats group 'fats' defined as 'products in the form of a solid or malleable emulsion, principally of the water-in-oil type, derived from solid and/or liquid vegetable and/or animal fats, suitable for human consumption and with a milk-fat content of at most 3% of the fat content'. Margarine contains at least 80% and at most 90% fat. Blend in this Regulation falls under the fats group 'fats composed of vegetable and/or animal products' defined as 'products in the form of a solid or malleable emulsion, principally of the water-in-oil type, derived from solid and/or liquid vegetable and/or animal fats, suitable for human consumption and with a milk-fat content of at least 10% and at most 80% of the total fat content'. 

In case of a deviating fat content of 60 to 62 percent the term '¾' may be used, and for 39 to 41 percent the term 'half-fat margarine'. Furthermore, half-fat margarine may also be designated as 'halvarine' or 'minarine', both forms of low-fat margarine. For other percentages, the term 'Product with x% fat' or 'Blended product with x% fat' must be used. The sales description may be supplemented with relevant plant and animal terms (such as 'sunflower margarine') or terms that refer to the designated use (e.g. 'camping margarine') or production method (e.g. 'organic margarine'). 

The designation 'vegetable' may be used if production involves the use of vegetable oils and fats and provided no gelatine is used (dry milk components are permitted, however). These products do not contain any substances derived from animals that are killed (for the purpose of these products). The designation 'pure vegetable' may be used if production does not involve the use of substances derived from animals. Pure vegetable products contain no ingredient of animal origin at all.

Regulation (EC) no. 1308/2013 Annex VII, Part VII, specifies when the terms 'Light' and 'reduced fat content' may be used or added. For claims, see the page claims.

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Last modified: October 9, 2017 14:13